“You do not know me….”

This is a fascinating clip. The pastor in the clip says he’s there because he he loves Jennifer and is “concerned” for her while making the claim that he is in no way condemning or judging her. His problem is that no one who is being objective really believes that. His very presence on the set is precisely due to the fact that he is judging her and indicating to her that she’s separated from “the family.” I love the way Knapp calls him out and wonders why, if “sin is sin” as he points out, he’s not sitting in her seat. Beautiful.

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8 thoughts on ““You do not know me….”

  1. i’m glad she’s able to be fully open about it, not that she hasn’t been in the past.
    i’m hoping her strength and courage to be open about who she is, will allow other ‘closeted’ christian artists to be able to speak out as well.

    rocksteady,
    danno~

  2. All I can say is wow… and that she handled herself very well. Theology aside, I am glad that she is pursuing Jesus rather than giving up on faith altogether. Thanks for posting this!

    PS – I just recently have been listening to all the old episodes of “Third Way Faith” podcast. Is that over now that Shane moved?

  3. I’m just wondering why he was even there… if he doesn’t know her, isn’t her “pastor” as she basically said, why did she even allow him to come on the air with her?

  4. She asks the question “what separates that particular sin out from the fact that I’m angry or mad at someone, or that I cheat or…”

    It’s a weak argument in this case.

    I don’t think it’s the idea of “sin” that is separating those two chairs.

    Sin is sin, they’re both sinners. Understood.

    The difference is this; she is asking for others to accept her sin as one that she doesn’t need to repent of—to basically accept that homosexuality is not a sin.

    But it is. And yes, we’re still all sinners. But should we knowingly sin and ask others (and God) to accept that we sin and have no desire to change?

    Would we have this discussion if the video was of a Christian singer who is a married heterosexual man, and openly unfaithful to his wife, but wants the pastor to answer the same question; “what separates [that] particular sin from being angry, lying, etc.?”

    The singer might say that he has strong feelings for other women, and that his wife doesn’t meet his needs. These feelings and desires come naturally to him, since he was young. He could say that he feels like he’s been living a lie to himself if he doesn’t come out in the open about his desires to be with many women and that he has been with many women… and what’s the difference between that and being angry?

    The answer is nothing—but for the fact that he’d want us (and God) to accept his sin without repentance or forgiveness or even stopping it. Make it no sin at all.

    I’m guessing that interview would never happen.

    If you’re a Christian and you believe that sin is sin… then overcome it through Christ.

    What “coming out” is really about… especially like this… is the attempt to redefine what “sin” includes and/or to put other people in a position of either 1) accepting that you don’t need to overcome that particular sin or 2) cast stones that they’re judging you… or being a bigot.

    If she’s a Christian and believes the word of God, then this is where the discussion stops:

    “Thou shalt not commit adultery” (you know, sex with a person that is not your spouse)

    and

    “Whosoever looketh on a woman to lust after her hath committed adultery with her already in his heart” (you know… LUST) (Matt 5:28)

    and

    “go and sin no more.” (John 8:11)

    Can we really say that He didn’t [specifically] mention a woman with a woman, or a man with a man, so it doesn’t count? Can we really say that He didn’t simply mean that ANYTHING sexual, outside of marriage would be sin?

    Sin is sin. Unless we redefine it.

    Sin is sin, so overcome it. Don’t justify it.

    We all have urges. We all have desires. We all have tendencies. We can all overcome them and be sanctified. But we need to call it like it is and sin “no more.”

    But that’s another discussion.

    “Know ye not that the unrighteous shall not inherit the kingdom of God? Be not deceived: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor effeminate, nor abusers of themselves with mankind… [and] flee fornication.” (1 Cor 6:9)

  5. It’s kind of curious that everyone is bashing him when he didn’t even get a chance to talk. It appeared that he came on to talk about a complicated subject with love (as far as I could see), and he was demonized. Give him credit for engaging a difficult subject.

  6. It’s hard to judge the motives of others but I think most people see his behavior and “love” isn’t the first word that comes to mind. It may be for you, and that’s fine, but I think it’s safe to say you’re in the minority.

  7. I believe that the pastor honestly believed that he was acting in love. He may have had some sort of conversation in his mind with God, with God asking: “Will you stand up for Me and My Holy Word? Even to Larry King? Even on national television? Even if ‘the world’ rejects you because of it?”

    “Yes Lord.”

    He is Peter, chopping off the ears of soldiers, always with the best intentions, but shedding plenty of blood nonetheless.

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